Organon Of Medicine - homeopathy360

Homoeopathy ” is a pseudoscientific system, created by Dr Samuel Hahnemann, in 1796.
The word ‘Homoeopathy’ is derived from two Greek words, Homo means Similar and Pathos means Suffering,which means similar suffering, believes that substance that causes symptoms of a disease in healthy people would cure similar symptoms in sick people; this doctrine is called ‘Similia Similibus Curenter‘ – ‘Like cures Like.’
Organon of the art of healing‘ by Dr Samuel Hahnemann, 1810, describes the doctrine of his ideas of homoeopathy. This work repeatedly revised by Dr Hahnemann and published in six editions, the name changed to Organon of Medicine.

First Edition (1810)
In 1796, some six years after Hahnemann first experienced the effect of Peruvian bark (cinchona), in 1970 and published the article on it. After conducting personal observations and some experiments, Hahnemann published the Homoeopathy in book form in 1810, which contains 271 aphorisms.
Original title of the book was Organon of rational art of healing. In which small couplets of Gallert’s were written-
“The truth we mortal need
Us blast to make and keep
Tha all wise slightly covered over
But did not bury deep.”

Second Edition (1819)
The second edition of Organon was published in the year 1819, which contains 315 aphorisms. In this edition the couplets of Gellert’s poem were replaced by the word ‘Aude sepere’ which means dare to be wise.

Third Edition (1824)
The third edition was published in 1824, which contains 317 aphorisms.

Fourth Edition (1829)
The fourth edition of Organon was published in 1829, it contained 292 aphorisms.
‘Theory of Vital Force’ makes its significant appearance in this edition.

Fifth Edition (1833)
The fifth edition of Organon was published in 1833, it contained 294 aphorisms.
Fifth edition has total summary of the previous four editions, making numerous references of vital force, miasms and potency selection.

Sixth Edition (1921)
The sixth edition of Organon was published long after his death, in 1921. It contained 291 aphorisms.
Later, it was translated in English by Dr William Boericke and given the title, Organon of Medicine. It contained several new additions and changes like ‘vital force’ to ‘vital principles ‘, the introduction of 50 millesimal scale of potentisation, changes in preparation and repetition of drugs.