A Review On Acute Abdomen And Homoeopathic Approach - homeopathy360

A Review On Acute Abdomen And Homoeopathic Approach

Authors:

Dr. Ashok yadav, HOD  Dept. Of Practice of Medicine (Hom.) Dr. M.P.K. Homoeopathic Medical College, Hospital and Research Center. Homoeopathy University, Jaipur.

Dr. Virendra chauhan , Prof.  Dept. Of Practice of Medicine (Hom.) Dr. M.P.K. Homoeopathic Medical College, Hospital and Research Center. Homoeopathy University, Jaipur.

Dr. Bhupendra Arya , MD Scholar, Department of Practice of Medicine (Hom.) , Dr. M.P.K Homoeopathic Medical College, a constituent college of Homoeopathy University, Jaipur.

Dr. Apurva Dixit , MD Scholar, Department of Practice of Medicine (Hom.) , Dr. M.P.K Homoeopathic Medical College, a constituent college of Homoeopathy University, Jaipur.

Dr. Dharmendra Saini , MD Scholar, Department of Practice of Medicine (Hom.) , Dr. M.P.K Homoeopathic Medical College, a constituent college of Homoeopathy University, Jaipur.

Abstract: This accounts for approximately 50% of all urgent admissions to general surgical units. The acute abdomen is a consequence of one or more pathological processes. .[1] It may be caused by an infection, inflammation, vascular occlusion or obstruction. .[1] This article provide information about acute abdomen along with homoeopathy medicine

Keywords: Acute abdomen, Homoeopathic medicine.

Introduction: Acute abdomen refers to a sudden, severe abdominal pain and is considered a medical emergency requiring immediate diagnosis and care. It is a consequence of one or more pathological processes.[1]

Causes and clinical features:[1]

  1. Inflammation: Pain develops gradually and movements exacerbates pain with abdominal guarding.
   
Appendicitis Pancreatitis
Diverticulitis Pyelonephritis
Cholecystitis Intra-abdominal abscess
Pelvic inflammatory disease
  • Perforation: when a viscus perforates, pain starts abruptly and its severe and leads to generalized peritonitis.
Peptic ulcer Ovarian cyst
Diverticular disease Aortic aneurysm
  • Obstruction: colicky pain with spasms which compel the patient to double up. Colicky pain which does not disappear between spasms suggests complicating inflammation.
Intestinal obstruction Ureteric colic                           
                   Biliary colic  

Investigations:[1]

  • Full blood count, urea, electrolytes and amylase taken to look evidence of dehydration, leucocytosis and pancreatitis.
  • An erect chest X-ray may show air under the diaphragm, suggestive of perforation and a plain abdominal film may show evidence of obstruction or ileus.
  • Abdominal ultrasound may help if gallstones or renal stones suspected and also useful in dection of free fluid  or any intra abdominal abscess.
  • Contrast studies by either mouth or anus to rule out intestinal obstruction.
  • CT scan and angiography.
  • Diagnostic laparotomy should be considered when the diagnosis has not been revealed by other investigations.
  • All patients must be carefully and regularly re-assessed every 2-4 hours so that any change in condition that might help in diagnosis and clinical decision.

Homoeopathic management:[2,3]

  1. Aconitum napellus: Hot, tense, enteritis. Sensitive to touch. Colic, no position relieves. Pains are intolerable, they drive him crazy; restless; at night. Abdominal symptoms are better after warm soup. Burning in the umbilical region.
  2. Aloe socotrina: Pulsating pain around navel, worse pressure. Cutting, gripping pain under the right ribs or in the right hypochondrium, right lower portion of the abdomen; excruciating before and during stool; all pain ceases after stool, leaving profuse sweating and extreme weakness; copious flatus.
  3. Belladonna: Distended, hot. Transverse colon protrudes like a pad. Tender, swollen. Pain as if clutched by a hand; worse jar, pressure. Cutting pain across; stitches on the left side of abdomen, when coughing, sneezing or touching it. Extreme sensitiveness to touch, to bed-clothes.
  4. Chamomilla: Flatulent colic, after anger with red cheeks and hot perspiration. Hepatic colic, acute duodenitis.
  5. Colchicum autumnale: Ascites. Borborygmi. Pain over liver region. Caecum and ascending colon distended. Autumnal dysentery; white mucus ‘scrapings of intestines’.
  6. Colocynthis: Agonising pain in abdomen causing patient to bend double with restlessness, twisting and turning to obtain relief >by hard pressure.
  7. Dioscorea villlosa: Feeble digestive powers. Violent twisting colic, in paroxysms, as if intestines were grasped by powerful hand. Colic pains <from bending forward and while lying >on standing erect or bending backwards.
  8. Dulcamara: Colic from cold. Acts prominently on umbilical region. Cutting pain around the navel. Swelling of the inguinal gland.
  9. Lycopodium: Hepatitis, atrophic form nutmeg liver. Pain shooting across the lower abdomen, from right to left. Abdomen bloated, constant sense of fermanetation, like yeast.
  10. Mag phos: Enteralgia, relived by pressure. Flatulent colic, forcing the patient to bend double; relieved by rubbing, warmth, pressure; accompanied with belching of gas, which gives no relief. Bloated abdomen, must loosen clothing, walk about and constantly pass flatus.
  11. Nux vomica: Flatulent distention with spasmodic colic. Colic from uncovering. Liver engorged, with stitches and soreness. Colic with upward pressure, causing short breath. Strangulated hernia.
  12. Plumbum metallicum: Excessive colic, radiating to all parts of body. Abdominal wall feels drawn by a string to the spine. Intussusceptions; strangulated hernia. Abdomen retracted, obstructed flatus with intense colic. Colic alternates with delirium and pain in atrophic limbs.
  13. Polygonum punctatum: Griping pain, with great rumbling, nausea and liquid faeces. Flatulent colic.
  14. Trombidium muscae: Severe pain before and after stool; stool only after eating. Gripping in the hypochondrium, in the morning. Hepatitis, brown, thin, watery stool with tenesmus.

References:

  1. Walker RB, Colledge RN, Ralston HS, Penman DI. Davidson’s Principles and Practice of Medicine. 22nd edition. China:Churchill Livingstone Elsevier;2014. Chapter 22. The acute abdomen;pg.861-862.
  2. Boericke William. Boerike’s new manual of homoeopathic materia medica with repertory. Third edition. New Delhi: B. Jain Publishers (P) Ltd.; 2000.
  3. Allen HC. Allen’s keynotes with leading remedies of the materia medica and bowel nosodes. Tenth edition. New Delhi: B. Jain Publishers (P)Ltd.; 2005.
BHUPENDRA ARYA
Author: BHUPENDRA ARYA

Dr.Bhupendra arya,MD Scholar, Department of practice of medicine , Dr. M.P.K.Homoeopathic Medical College , a constituent college of Homoeopathy University , jaipur

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