Boger Boenninghausen’s Characteristics And Repertory (B.B.C.R.) - homeopathy360

Boger Boenninghausen’s Characteristics And Repertory (B.B.C.R.)

  • INTRODUCTION

Perhaps one of the greatest piece of homoeopathic literature left by Dr Boger is the Boenninghausen’s Characteristics and Repertory. “The combined observations and logic of Boenninghausen and the wide and wise observations garnered by Dr Boger from long years of study and practice,” is the tribute that Dr H.A. Roberts paid to Boger. Boger indeed helped the profession by pulling all his experiences in the evolution of ‘Portrait of Disease’ (natural as well as artificial).

Dr C.M. Boger was a leading practitioner of United States in the early decades of the twentieth century. As a practical man he well understood the difficulties faced by the practitioners of his days in finding out a correct correspondence in the materia medica in the shortest possible time. The perceptive mind of this German physician soon discovered that, in spite of the availability of a plethora of literature and clinical experiences, the burning question was, how best those could be put to use. In his time, both the Boenninghausen and Kentian schools were popular. Boger made a study of both but accepted Boenninghausen’s way of working out of a case. Finding that the practitioners had to depend on existing faulty translations of Repertory of Antipsoric Remedies, he embarked upon the task of translating it in 1900. In the course of his translation work, he was further convinced that Boenninghausen’s basic principles, plan and construction were sound, and that the book was comprehensible, and hence practicable. Boger was also aware of the difficulties faced by the practitioners while using the Therapeutic Pocket Book as well as criticism leveled against its principles and methodology.

Boger also undertook the major work of rewriting Boenninghausen’s repertory. This he did by adding aggravations, ameliorations and concomitants in a detailed manner at the end of every chapter. The outcome was a more useful work enriched with many new chapters, new rubrics and medicines. The total number of medicines used in this repertory comes to 464. It was published by Boericke and Tafel in 1905. Even thereafter, Boger continued to work on the repertory; however, death snatched him away before he could give the final version. His manuscripts were published posthumously with the assistance of his wife, by Roy & Co., India in 1937.

This second edition proved very useful in successfully working out cases. It contains characteristics of medicines in the first part and repertory proper in the second. Hence, the title Boenninghausen’s Characteristics and Repertory. The work is an attempt to bridge Boenninghausen and Kent.

Dr Dario Spinedi who wrote a foreword to ‘Complete Repertory’ writes, ‘I discovered that Boger’s Boenninghausen’s Repertory is a real gold mine for all kinds of symptoms.’

Dr J.H. Clarke says,” Dr Boger’s large work, Boenninghausen’s Characteristics and Repertory, contains Boenninghausen’s Characteristic Materia Medica as well as the repertories of all his work combined into one. It is a most valuable compilation.”


  • PHILOSOPHICAL BACKGROUND

Boenninghausen’s pioneering work was in great use during the second half of the nineteenth century, because it was the only work of it’s kind available to the practitioners. However, with the publication of Kent’s repertory in 1897, it receded to the back stage. Consequently, Boenninghausen’s work as well as his principles, were overlooked. Boger creditably resuscitated Boenninghausen by refining and enriching the fundamentals and recasting the structure and methodology.

Boger, while working on Boenninghausen’s repertory, subscribed to the principle of totality of symptoms, which was originally given by Hahnemann. He was fully in agreement with the idea of what constitutes a complete symptom, which is studied in relation to four factors, viz, location, sensation, modalities and concomitant.

Boger’s work Boenninghausen’s Characteristics and Repertory is based on the following fundamental concepts:

  1. Doctrine of complete symptoms and concomitants.
  2. Doctrine of pathological generals.
  3. Doctrine of causation and time.
  4. Clinical rubrics.
  5. Evaluation of remedies.
  6. Fever totality.
  7. Concordances.

1.     Doctrine of Complete Symptoms and Concomitants

Patient narrates the story and details the suffering during the clinical interview. All symptoms are not concrete and complete. A complete symptom is that which consists of location, sensation and modalities. During the interview, unreasonable attendants of main symptoms are also noticed in relation to the time (before, during or after), which are called concomitants. Boger borrowed the idea of a complete symptom from Boenninghausen’s method of erecting a totality, but he improved over it by relating sensation and modalities to specific parts, thereby he fairly and squarely met the criticism.

In the book, the complete symptoms are well arranged and it is seldom necessary to do grand generalization regarding sensation and modalities. Concomitants are given greater importance by Boger in relation to the parts.

2.     Doctrine of Pathological Generals

Boger was not satisfied by merely following the principle of complete symptoms, but he went further to seek general changes in the tissues and parts of the body. Today, with our advanced knowledge of medicine, it is not difficult to understand the importance of pathological generals mentioned by him in the repertory.

Pathological generals tell the state of the whole body and it’s changes in relation to the constitution. They help us to concentrate on more concrete changes to select the simillimum. The chapter in the book ‘Sensations and Complaints in General’ is full of examples of pathological generals, which include discharges, structural alterations, constitutions, diathesis, etc (for a detail study, cf. section 6).

3.     Doctrine of Causation and Time

Boger has given an adequate place and importance to causation and time of the expressions. Each chapter in the book is followed by time aggravation. The section on aggravation also contains many causative factors. From his point of view, causation and time factors are more definite and reliable in cases as well as in medicines. In his own practice, he has successfully employed these factors to find out a simillimum in the shortest possible time. His other works also substantiate the importance of these factors. In the chapter ‘Choosing the Remedy’ he gives importance to the miasmatic cause, as well as exciting cause.

From Boger’s Synoptic Key, a valuable gift to the homoeopathic world, it is obvious that his hierarchy in evaluating symptoms was somewhat different from Boenninghausen and Kent. He gives more importance to causation and general modalities (mental and physical) followed by general sensations (pathological generals and physical generals), which hold the key in the remedy as well as in the person. Thus, according to Boger, they need to be given an adequate place in repertorization.

4.     Clinical Rubrics

Boger was not the first person, who appreciated the use of clinical conditions in grouping medicines and their use in selecting a remedy in absence of characteristic symptoms in the case. But he was the first one who appreciated and mentioned several clinical conditions, which he came across in day to day practice. Though they should be put to a limited use, they help the physician in cases of advanced pathology that is, gross tissue changes where he is left without a clear picture because of poor susceptibility. These rubrics are useful to arrive at a group of medicines, which can be further narrowed down, with the help of modalities and concomitants to select finally the most similar remedy.

5.     Evaluation of Remedies

Boger followed the same innovation, which Boenninghausen introduced in the grading of remedies. He introduced the grading of symptoms into five ranks by the use of different typography such as:

CAPITAL 5
Bold 4
Italics 3
Roman 2
(Roman) in parenthesis (1), rarely used.

The gradation is based on the frequency of the appearance of symptoms in the provers. Thus five mark medicines are most important and one mark least important.

Note: The original gradation of Boenninghausen was only four. He did not give importance to Roman parenthesis.

6.     Fever Totality

This is the unique contribution of Boger. The arrangement of the chapter on Fever is self-explanatory. Each stage of fever is followed by time, aggravation, amelioration and concomitant. Thus, they help to repertorize any simple as well as complicated case of fever.

7.     Concordances

By including a chapter on Concordance, Boger has made the philosophy clearer and practical, though it deals with relationship of medicines of only 125 remedies. Concordances should be worked on the same principle as is followed in Therapeutics Pocket Book (for a detailed study, cf. chapter-1, section 8).

  • PLAN AND CONSTRUCTION

Having found certain difficulties in the day to day use of Therapeutic Pocket Book, Boger tried to modify the structure and content of the book by adding many medicines and rubrics drawn from his own experiences and other sources. Thus, the book has undergone a vast change, but it’s principles have remained unchanged.

While compiling the repertory, Boger followed the basic plan and construction of Boenninghausen’s Repertory of Anti- psoric Medicines, which could overcome many difficulties faced in using Therapeutic Pocket Book.

Unlike Boenninghausen, he made several sections for different parts of the body and he added many rubrics and subrubrics. The chapter on Fever has been entirely changed in its arrangements as well as in its contents for easy reference. However, he used the same gradation as that of Boenninghausen

The repertory embraces the psoric and the antipsoric repertories, the sides of body, the repertory part of the intermittent fever and of whooping cough as well as a large number of paragraphs from the aphorisms of Hippocrates.

In order to understand the book, it is imperative to acquaint oneself with it’s plan, construction and arrangement.

  1. MIND
    Time
    Aggravation
    Amelioration
    Concomitants
    Cross-reference
    Agg. – Cross-reference
  2. SENSORIUM
    Aggravation and Amelioration
  3. VERTIGO
    Time
    Aggravation
    Amelioration
    Concomitants
    Agg. – Cross-reference
    Conc. – Cross-reference
  4. HEAD
    Internal
    Time
    Aggravation
    Amelioration
    Cross-references
    Agg. – Cross-reference
    Amel. – Cross-reference
    External
    Time
    Aggravation
    Amelioration
    Cross-reference
  5. EYES
    Cross-reference
    Eyebrows
    Eyebrows – Cross-reference
    Orbits
    Orbits – Cross-reference
    Eyelids
    Eyelids – Cross-reference
    Canthi
    Time Aggravation
    Amelioration
    Vision
    Time
    Aggravation
    Amelioration
  6. EARS
    Hearing
    Time
    Aggravation
    Amelioration
  7. NOSE
    Smell
    Time
    Aggravation
    Amelioration
    Coryza
    Time
    Aggravation
    Amelioration
    Concomitants
  8. FACE
    Lips
    Lower Jaw and Maxillary Joints
    Chin
    Time
    Aggravation
    Amelioration
  9. TEETH
    Gums
    Time
    Aggravation
    Amelioration
    Concomitants
  10. MOUTH
    Palate

    Throat (and Gullet)
    Saliva
    Tongue
    Time
    Aggravation
    Amelioration
  11. APPETITE
    Time
  12. THIRST
    Time
  13. TASTE
    Time
    Aggravation
    Amelioration
  14. ERUCTATION
    Time
    Aggravation
    Amelioration
  15. WATERBRASH and HEARTBURN
    Time
    Aggravation
  16. HICCOUGH
    Time
    Aggravation
    Amelioration
  17. NAUSEA and VOMITING
    Time
    Aggravation
    Amelioration
    Concomitants
    Cross-reference
    Agg. – Cross-reference
  18. STOMACH
  19. EPIGASTRIUM
    Time
    Aggravation
    Amelioration
    Concomitants
    Cross-reference
  20. HYPOCHONDRIA
    Time
    Aggravation
    Amelioration
    Cross-reference
  21. ABDOMEN
    Time
    Aggravation
    Amelioration
    Cross-reference
    Agg. – Cross-reference
    Amel. – Cross-reference
  22. EXTERNAL ABDOMEN
    Aggravation
    Cross-references
  23. INGUINAL and PUBIC REGION
    Aggravation
    Cross-reference
    Mons pubis
  24. FLATULANCE
    Time
    Aggravation
    Amelioration
    Cross-reference
    Agg. – Cross-reference
  25. STOOL
    Concomitants – Before stool
    Concomitants – During stool
    Concomitants – After stool Time
    Aggravation and Amelioration
    Cross-reference
    Concomitants
    Before stool – Cross-reference
    Concomitants
    During stool – Cross-reference
    Concomitants
    After stool – Cross-reference
    Aggravation and Amelioration – Cross-reference
  26. ANUS and RECTUM
    Conditions
    Cross-reference
  27. PERINEUM
    Conditions
    Cross-reference
  28. PROSTATE GLAND
  29. URINE
    Sediment
    Micturition
    Before urination
    At beginning of urination
    During urination
    At close of urination
    After urination
    Conditions of urination
    Cross-reference
    Sediment – Cross-reference
    Micturition – Cross-reference
    During urination –Cross-reference
    After urination – Cross-reference
  30. URINARY ORGANS
    Kidneys
    Ureters
    Bladder
    Urethra
    Meatus
    Conditions
    Kidneys – Cross to corrected
    Bladder – Cross-reference
    Urethra – Cross-reference
  31. GENITALIA
    Male Organs
    Penis
    Glans
    Prepuce
    Spermatic cord
    Testes
    Scrotum
    Female Organs
    Time
    Conditions
    Male organs – Cross-reference
    Penis – Cross-reference
    Glans – Cross-reference
    Prepuce – Cross-reference
    Spermatic cord – Cross-reference
    Testes – Cross-reference
    Scrotum – Cross-reference
    Female organs – Cross-reference
    Conditions – Cross-reference
  32. SEXUAL IMPULSE
    Concomitants of coition
    Concomitants after coition
    Concomitants after pollutions
    Concomitants after coition – Cross-reference
    Concomitants after pollutions – Cross-reference
  33. MENSTRUATION
    Concomitants before menses
    Concomitants at start of menses
    Concomitants during menses
    Concomitants after menses
    Leucorrhoea
    Concomitants to leucorrhoea
    Cross-reference
    Leucorrhoea – Cross-reference
  34. RESPIRATION
    Impeded by Time
    Aggravation
    Amelioration
    Concomitants
  35. COUGH
    Time
    Excited or aggravated by
    Amelioration
    Concomitants
    Expectoration
    Expectoration, taste of Expectoration, odour of
  36. LARYNX and TRACHEA
    Aggravation
  37. VOICE and SPEECH
    Time
    Conditions of voice
  38. NECK and EXTERNAL THROAT
    Nape
    Time
    Aggravation
    Amelioration
  39. CHEST
    Inner External
    Axillae
    Mammae
    Nipples
    Heart and region of

    Time
    Aggravation Amelioration
  40. BACK
    Scapular Region
    Back Proper – Dorsal Region

    Lumbar Region – Small of Back in General
    Sacrum and Coccyx
    Spinal Column and Vertebrae
    Time
    Aggravation
    Amelioration
  41. UPPER EXTREMITIES
    Time
    Aggravation
    Amelioration
  42. LOWER EXTREMITIES
    Time
    Aggravation
    Amelioration
  43. SENSATIONS and COMPLAINTS IN GENERAL
  44. GLANDS
  45. BONES
  46. SKIN and EXTERIOR BODY
    Aggravation
    Time
  47. SLEEP
    Falling asleep
    Positions during
    Waking
  48. DREAMS
    Aggravation
  49. FEVER
    Pathological Types

    Blood
    Circulation
    Congestions
    Palpitation
    Time
    Heart Beat
    Pulse
    Time
    Aggravation
    CHILL
    Partial chill
    Coldness
    Partial coldness
    Shivering
    Time
    Aggravation
    Amelioration
    Concomitants
    Mind
    Head
    External head
    Eyes
    Vision
    Ears
    Nose
    Coryza
    Face
    Lips
    Teeth
    Mouth and throat
    Appetite
    Thirst
    Taste
    Eructation, nausea
    Qualmishness and vomiting
    Stomach, hypochondria
    Abdomen
    Stool
    Urine
    Respiration
    Cough
    Larynx
    Chest
    Back and lumbar region
    Upper extremities
    Lower extremities
    Skin
    Sleep
    HEAT AND FEVER IN GENERAL
    Partial heat
    Time
    Aggravation
    Amelioration
    Concomitants
    Mind
    Head
    External head
    Eyes
    Ears
    Nose
    Coryza
    Face
    Lips
    Lower jaw
    Teeth and gums
    Mouth
    Throat
    Appetite
    Thirst
    Taste
    Eructation and waterbrash
    Nausea and vomiting
    Stomach
    Hypochondria
    Abdomen
    Flatus
    Stool
    Urine
    Respiration
    Cough
    Larynx
    External throat and neck
    Chest
    Back
    Upper extremities
    Lower extremities
    Sensations and generalities
    Glands
    Bones
    Skin
    Sleep
    SWEAT
    Partial
    Time
    Aggravation
    Amelioration
    Concomitants
    Mind
    Head
    Eyes
    Ears
    Nose
    Coryza
    Face
    Lips
    Lower jaw
    Teeth and gums
    Mouth
    Throat
    Appetite
    Thirst
    Taste
    Eructations and water brash
    Nausea and vomiting
    Stomach
    Hypochondria
    Abdomen
    Stool
    Urine
    Respiration
    Cough
    Larynx
    External throat and neck
    Chest
    Back
    Upper extremities
    Lower extremities
    Sensations and generalities
    Glands
    Skin
    Bones
    Sleep
  50. COMPOUND FEVERS
    Beginning with chill
    Beginning with shivering
    Beginning with heat
    Beginning with sweat
  51. CONDITIONS IN GENERAL Time
  52. CONDITIONS OF AGGRAVATION and AMELIORATION IN GENERAL
  53. CONCORDANCES

  • ARRANGEMENT

Most of the sections in the book start with the rubric In general.’ This rubric groups those prominent medicines, which are capable of producing different types of symptoms in relation to that organ/location. Clinically, these medicines have an affinity towards those particular organs. This grouping may not help us in the process of systematic repertorization, but it can be of much help to know the affinity towards the parts. It suggests organ remedies, which may be useful for finding out a drug for palliation, when only a few prescribing symptoms are available in the case.

Location rubrics are followed by further subdivisions of parts, with each part having rubrics like ‘side’ and ‘extending to.’ After the location, different sensations are arranged in an alphabetical order. Each sensation is a general rubric, which is followed by a group of medicines. It is divided into subrubrics under which, parts are mentioned (mostly abbreviations). Rubrics for the pain are further divided into various types of pain that is, aching, burning, etc. Usually these subrubrics are too specific and have a less number of medicines. Thus, these subrubrics are less useful in repertorization.

The rubrics for location and sensation are mixed and there are no separate headings given for them, but it is easy to understand because there is an order, that is, after location, sensations are arranged in an alphabetical order. This is followed by time, aggravation, amelioration, concomitant and cross- reference.
For example:
HEAD — INTERNAL
In general
PARTS — FOREHEAD
LOCATION
sub-divisions
Extending to
Eye region of – sides
Extending to
TEMPLE
Sides
Extending to
ETC.
(Separate chapters)
Abdomen — as if from
Aching — PARTS (subrubrics)
Forehead           (F)
Temples            (T)
Sides                 (S)
Vertex               (V)
Occipital           (O)
ETC.
TIME
AGGRAVATION                                   
AMELIORATION 
CONCOMITANTS— NOT GIVEN
CROSS-REFERENCE

  • IMPORTANCE AND USE OF SUBSECTIONS

1. Location and Sensation

Location and sensation are mixed in Boger’s repertory; so separate headings are not given for them. Usually the location is further split into different subdivisions, sides and extension. This subsection of location is useful because it groups medicines for the parts. In repertorization, if a rubric is selected for parts, these rubrics can be used.

In the repertory, sensation begins after the end of location. Usually a horizontal line indicates the end of location and beginning of sensation. Different sensations and pathological conditions are mentioned in relation to each part. Therefore it meets the usual objections raised against Boenninghausen’s grand generalization.

Each specific sensation is again attached to the sub- divisions of the main location. This is useful from the point  of repertorization as it specifies the sensation and contains a group of medicines. Rubrics, which contain smaller group of medicines, can be used only for reference purpose.

2.  Time

Here the medicines are grouped under broad divisions of time like, daytime, morning, forenoon, noon, etc. There are no specific hours mentioned, unlike the Kent’s repertory. This subsection of time is given at the end of each section. This sub- section specifies the aggravation of complaints at a particular time. In some chapters, specific hours are mentioned with a very small group of medicines. This is useful because most of the patients mention broad divisions of time rather than the exact hour of suffering.

3.  Aggravation

This subsection contains factors, which increase the specific complaints of the part, and it also includes the factors, which excite or bring on the complaints.

Some of the concomitant factors are also found in this subsection especially in those sections which are not followed by a separate chapter on concomitants.

This subsection is larger than amelioration and most useful for repertorization, particularly for acute cases or so-called short cases.

4.  Amelioration

It is found in practice that the patient finds it difficult to present ameliorating factors. Thus, this subsection contains lesser number of rubrics and is given lesser importance in repertorization. The ameliorating factor is used for the purpose of individualizing the case.

5.  Concomitants

This is a major contribution of Boger to the homoeopathic system of medicine. He has worked hard to collect concomitants from different sources — namely provings, clinical experience and verifications which were not accessible to the profession earlier. This is a valuable addition for the purpose of repertorization.

Most of the concomitant subsections are well explained and arranged in an alphabetical order, but a few subsections have only a group of medicines (for instance, ‘Mind’ section), which are obviously less useful.

Chapter on fever is extremely rich in concomitants in relation to chill, heat and sweat under different subheadings. For this Boger is gratefully remembered. However, all chapters are not followed by this subsection.

6.  Cross-reference

This is another significant subsection, which makes the repertory more useful and comprehensible. In our day to day practice, we get a maze of symptoms in some cases and in a few there is scarcity of expressions, but in both conditions we have to evaluate and come to the characteristic symptoms for a prescription. To locate these hard-earned characteristic symptoms in the repertory, we must adequately interpret and convert them into rubrics. This subsection helps us to do this and also to clear our confusion about similar rubrics. However, cross-reference is not given at the end of all chapters.

Sub-sections in Repertory
Concomitants Enlisting Only a Group of Medicines Concomitants
Given in Detail
Modalities (Agg. and Amel.)
Not Given
Only Aggravation is Given Conditions Given for Modalities
Mind Vertigo Appetite Watebrash & heartburn Anus
& rectum
Respiration Coryza Thirst External abdomen Perineum
Teeth Prostate gland Pubic region Genitalia
  Nausea & vomiting Menstruation Larynx
& trachea
Voice
& speech
  Stomach Sensation
& complaints
in general
Skin &
exterior body
Urine
  Stool Glands Urinary organs
  Urine Bones
  Sexual impulseSleep
  Menstruation Dreams
  Cough  
  Fever  
  • PATHOLOGICAL GENERALS

Pathological generals are the expressions of the person, which are known by a study of the changes at the tissue level. Certain types of constitutions are prone to certain pathological changes to different levels of system and organs. An individual may respond to constant unfavourable stimuli through pathological changes in different tissues, but a common propensity might still persist. This common change in different tissues shows the behaviour of the whole constitution, which is important to understand the individual. This requires knowledge of pathology, keen observation and careful study of the symptoms on the part of the physician to detect the pathological generals in a patient and use it for finding out a simillimum. Boger emphasized the importance of pathological generals both in his repertory and his book General Analysis. Both books can be used side by side for the purpose of repertorization.

For examples:

  1. If a person shows degenerative changes at many locations and/or signs of early senility, the rubric would be Senility.
  2. Discharges, if common to two or more parts.
  3. If more than two parts show a similar kind of pathology.
  4. Involvement of general location – glands, folds, orifices, etc.
  5. Certain tendencies – Suppuration, haemorrhagic or diathesis – uric acid diathesis, etc.
  6. Constitution types and miasmatic expressions.

A Few Pathological Generals in the Repertory

  • Atrophy/Emaciation – Sensations and Complaints in General
  • Chlorosis – Sensations and Complaints in General
  • Constitution – Sensations and Complaints in General
  • Consumption – Sensations and Complaints in General
  • Convulsions, spasms – Sensations and Complaints in General
  • Discharges – Sensations and Complaints in General
  • Dropsy – Sensations and Complaints in General
  • Haemorrhage – Sensations and Complaints in General tendency to
  • Hypochondriasis – Sensations and Complaints in General
  • Indurations – Sensations and Complaints in General
  • Inflammations  – Sensations and Complaints in General
  • Mucous membranes – Sensations and Complaints in General affected
  • Muscles in general – Sensations and Complaints in General
  • Obesity, corpulency – Sensations and Complaints in General
  • Offensiveness – Sensations and Complaints in General
  • Paralysis agitans – Sensations and Complaints in General
  • Scorbutic symptoms – Sensations and Complaints in General
  • Serous membranes – Sensations and Complaints in General
  • Suppuration – Sensations and Complaints in General
  • Swelling –  Sensations and Complaints in General
  • Sycosis –  Sensations and Complaints in General
  • Syphilis –  Sensations and Complaints in General
  • Torpidity –  Sensations and Complaints in General
  • Uraemia –  Sensations and Complaints in General
  • Ulcers – Sensations and Complaints in General
  • Uric acid diathesis – Aggravation  and  Amelioration
  • Senility – Aggravation and Amelioration

Different kinds of sensations or pains if noticed in many parts can be taken as ‘general.’ All the rubrics mentioned in ‘sensations and complaints in general’ are not pathological generals. Rubrics become pathological generals only if the case expresses likewise.

Boger’s General Analysis and Synoptic Key are also useful for the purpose of using pathological generals.

Advantage

If the case shows a pathological general, it can be repertorized by following Boger’s method. Thus, finding out the simillimum would be easier.

Caution

  1. Symptoms should be clearly interpreted from the standpoint of pathology and expression. A forced pathological general would fail to produce any result.
  2. The grouping of remedies against these rubrics is largely based on clinical observations and confirmation, thus contain imperfect list. Some rubrics contain very few medicines. Thus their use in repertorization should be cautiously made.
  3. Physician must use his discrimination in the application of these rubrics in practice. The medicine should not be used just because it covers two pathologies at two or more than two parts, but it should agree with the whole picture.
  • REFERRING TO SOME IMPORTANT RUBRICS

Alcoholism, intoxication – Mind
Awkwardness –  Mind
Guilt, sense of –  Mind
Hydrophobia –  Mind
Hypochondriasis – Mind, Sensations and Complaints
Hysteria – Mind, Sensations and Complaints
Confused –  Mind
Confusion – Sensorium
Muscles don’t respond to will– Mind
Phlegmatic – Mind
Unsociable, shy, aversion to society – Mind
Society agg. – Aggravation and Amelioration
Yielding disposition – Mind
Faintness – Sensorium, Sensations and Complaints
Hydrocephalus – Head, internal
Parotid glands – Ear, face
Sinuses – Nose
Sneezing – Coryza
Zygoma – Face
Glands – salivary –  Mouth
Stomatitis –  Mouth
Uvula – Mouth, Palate
Diphtheria – Throat
Globus hystericus – Throat
Aversions and desires – Appetite
Hiccough – Eructation, Hiccough
Cough ends in eructation – Eructation agg.
Acidity – Stomach, Heartburn, Eructation Pancreas, diaphragm
Spleen, gall bladder – Hypochondria
Ascites – Abdomen
Hernia, inguinal – Inguinal and Pubic Region
Hydrocele –  Genitalia – Scrotum
Pregnancy, complaints during -Genitalia – Female Organs
Pregnancy – Aggravation and Amelioration
Prostatic fluid loss of, stool during – Sexual Impulse
Cheyne-Stokes respiration – Respiration
Croup – Larynx and Trachea
Asthma milleri (spasm of) – Larynx and Trachea
Bronchitis – Chest
Tuberculosis, pulmonary –  Chest
Angina pectoris – Heart and region of
Goiter, heart –   Heart and region of
Air, aversion to, open – Sensations and Complaints
Anemia – Fever, circulation
Asphyxia –   Sensations and Complaints
Anxious feeling (internal anxiety) –   Sensations and Complaints
Anxiety in limbs – anxious feeling – Sensations and Complaints
Asleep, sensation in limbs – Sensations and Complaints
Atrophy of different parts – Sensations and Complaints
Carried wants to be – Mind, Aggravation and Amelioration
Constitutions – Sensations and Complaints
Symptoms of joints – Sensations and Complaints
Haemophilia – Sensations and Complaints
Hard bed, sense of, feel that bed is hard – Sensations and Complaints
Heated, easily becomes (easily feels heated) – Sensations and Complaints
Hydrophobia, hypochondriasis, hysteria – Mind, Sensations and Complaints
Ill, sense of being – Mind, Sensations and Complaints
Increasing (pain slowly increasing to climax, coming down slowly etc) – Sensations and Complaints
Infants, affections of – Sensations and Complaints
Influenza – Sensations and Complaints
Lightness of limbs– Sensations and Complaints
Ophisthotonos – Sensations and Complaints
Paralysis agitans – Sensations and Complaints
Diphtheritic –   Sensations and Complaints
Limbs –   Sensations and Complaints
Rheumatic –   Sensations and Complaints
Puberty, youth – Sensations and Complaints
Running like a mouse along limbs – Sensations and Complaints
Scurvy – Sensations and Complaints
Sensation, illusions of – Sensations and Complaints
Illusions – Mind
Sense, illusions of –  Mind
Smaller, shrinking, sense of – Sensations and Complaints
Sequelae – Sensations and Complaints
Spasm – dentition (convulsion during dentition) – Sensations and Complaints
Uterine – Sensations and  Complaints
Menstrual – Sensations and  Complaints
Spots (complaints/sensation in spots) – Sensations and  Complaints
Sudden  (pain comes suddenly and goes suddenly) – Sensations and Complaints
Walk (difficulty in learning walking in children) – Sensations and Complaints
Well feeling (denies being sick) – Sensations and Complaints
Curvature (rachitis) – Bones
Fracture – slow union (slow union) – Bones
Necrosis (septic osteomyelitis) – Bones
Abscess, boils, carbuncle (difficult to heal) – Skin
Eruption – unhealthy – Skin
Unhealthy – Skin
Hair falling – Skin
Nails affected in general – Skin
Pathological types (fever types of)  – Fever
Concomitants of chill, heat, sweat – Fever
Alone (desires solitude) – Aggravation and Amelioration
Company, aversion to- Mind
Company – Aggravation and Amelioration
Society – Aggravation and Amelioration
Children in, women, females, for, pregnancy, climacteric, dentition, during – Aggravation and Amelioration
Distant (complaint causes symptoms at distant parts) – Aggravation and Amelioration
Diverting the mind ameliorates – Aggravation and Amelioration
Driving or riding in a carriage, (symptoms caused by journey, travelling) – Aggravation and Amelioration aggravates Emotions, aggravates (different mental modalities) – Aggravation and Amelioration
Food and drinks (agg. & amel.) – Aggravation and Amelioration
Frost – Aggravation and Amelioration
Hang down (letting limbs) – Aggravation and Amelioration
Injury and shock – Aggravation and Amelioration
Loss of vital fluids – Aggravation and Amelioration
Lying on (postural modalities) – Aggravation and Amelioration
Lying on (symptoms appear on opposite side of lying on) – Aggravation and Amelioration
Side, pain goes to side at which he is not lying – Aggravation and Amelioration
Moon (modalities related to) – Aggravation and Amelioration
Music, intolerance of – Aggravation and Amelioration
Old age, senility – Aggravation and Amelioration
Shipboard on (seasickness) – Aggravation and Amelioration
Shock, nervous – Aggravation and Amelioration
Stomach, disordered – Aggravation and Amelioration
Stone cutters for – Aggravation and Amelioration
Suckling (nursing agg.) – Aggravation and Amelioration
Sun (agg. and amel.) – Aggravation and Amelioration
Suppressions – Aggravation and Amelioration
Talk of others – Aggravation and Amelioration
Thinking of his disease – Aggravation and Amelioration
Uric acid diathesis – Aggravation and Amelioration
Wet, getting drenched (getting wet in the rain, complaints from) – Aggravation and Amelioration

  • METHODS OF REPERTORIZATION

Boenninghausen’s Characteristics and Repertory has got it’s own advantages over other repertories. It is well explained, well arranged, follows a definite plan and construction and is based on a sound philosophy. Adequate acquaintance with the repertory is needed to put it to maximum use.

Boger has given greater importance to causation, time dimensions, modalities and generals (pathological, physical and mental). The repertory can be used by following the methods mentioned below which allow us to use it in different cases of different dimensions with individual pictures. Therefore, it is the case, which decides the method to be applied to select a simillimum, not the physician. It is a highly qualitative approach, and hence any kind of manipulation or twisting of data should be strictly avoided. Mental state should be used for final selection of the drug in all the methods given below. Selection of method is entirely based on the availability of data in a case.

1.  Using Causative Modalities in the First Place

This method would be useful if the case has definite causative modalities and other expressions, which are arranged below according to the hierarchy.

CAUSATIVE MODALITIES (Ailments from):
Mental and physical, that is, fear, excitement, getting wet, etc.
OTHER MODALITIES:
AGGRAVATIONS                     – Mental, Physical
AMELIORATIONS                   – Mental, Physical
PHYSICAL GENERALS
CONCOMITANTS 
LOCATION and SENSATIONS
(Example — Case–1)

2.  Using Modalities in the First Place

Sometimes we find that a case is not presented with causative modalities, but it has other general as well as particular modalities. Such cases can be repertorized by using the following order:

MODALITIES  – Mental, Physical
CONCOMITANTS
PHYSICAL GENERALS
LOCATIONS and SENSATIONS

3.  Using Concomitants in the First Place

In some cases, if clear concomitants are available even without any modalities, such types of cases can be successfully repertorized with the help of this repertory by following the order given below.

CONCOMITANTS
MODALITIES
PHYSICAL GENERALS
LOCATIONS and SENSATIONS, ETC.
(Example – Case–2)

4.  Using Pathological Generals

These are the changes in the tissues at different locations in a person, which follow a pattern; thus they show the expression of deviation in the constitution and it is very important in erecting a totality. The following order should be followed:

PATHOLOGICAL GENERALS
PHYSICAL GENERALS
CONCOMITANTS
MODALITIES
(Example – Case–3)

5.  Using Diagnostic Rubrics

Boger has contributed many clinical conditions in the repertory and they can be used when the case does not have any other choice, or if the case lacks in characteristic expressions. This helps mainly in finding out a palliative drug, or a drug which is suitable in helping to overcome the present crisis. It should be arranged as follows:

CLINICAL RUBRIC
AGGRAVATIONS
AMELIORATIONS
WEAK CONCOMITANT
PHYSICAL GENERALS
(Example — Case–4)

6.  Following Roberts’ (Boenninghausen’s Therapeutic Pocket Book) Method

LOCATIONS and SENSATIONS
MODALITIES
CONCOMITANTS
PHYSICAL GENERALS

Here sensations and modalities are first referred to the parts concerned. In case the particular sensation and modalities are absent, they can be referred to in the general chapter. If general modalities are represented well (that is, if the rubric contains more number of medicines), they should be used for the purpose of repertorization (Example – Case –5).

7.  Fever Totality

In a fever case, if the stages (chill, heat, sweat) are distinct, the following order would be preferable; if some stage is not available in the case, only the next stage should be used for repertorization.

CHILL
Type/Partial chill/Coldness-partial/Shivering Time
Aggravation Amelioration Concomitant
HEAT
Type/Partial Time Aggravation Amelioration Concomitant
SWEAT
Type/Partial Time Aggravation Amelioration Concomitant
(Example – Case–6)

Pathological types of fever mentioned in the repertory can be used for reference and final selection of the drug, but more importance should be given to the repertorial result, which is obtained by following the above order. Sometimes these rubrics (pathological types) can be used by following the fifth method mentioned earlier.

Section on blood circulation (congestion, palpitation, heartbeat, and pulse) should be used if symptoms are prominent during any stage of fever.

8.  Use of Concordance Chapter

This chapter deals with the relationship of remedies. The chapter can be used by following the same method, which is used in working on the Relationship of Medicines in Boenninghausen’s Therapeutic Pocket Book (see Part II, 1.3.4.7).

CASES WORKED OUT WITH BOENNINGHAUSEN’S CHARACTERISTICS AND REPERTORY

CASE–1

A lady, 50 years, unmarried, complaining of joint pains since 20 years, came for homoeopathic treatment. She had tried allopathic, ayurvedic and homoeopathic therapies (for one year) that gave slight relief for a short period, but the complaint remained.
It was diagnosed to be a case of rheumatoid arthritis with the following picture (in brief):

Location Sensation Modalities Accompaniments
Joints, small and big, since 20 years Slow onset Pain and swelling of single joint.
Pain as of a scorpion bite, burning, impo- ssible to put feet down to rest.
Stiffness3.
After tension3    
< sour things2
< cold things2
< potatoes2
< milk2
>hot water bag3
>gentle massage
>gasting < morning2 < damp3
Lump-like swelling here
and there which
disappeared on massaging

When she is excited due to worries and tension, her complaints increase; it also caused difficulty in breathing and some throat trouble. History or tonsillectomy in childhood. She used to get frequent colds.

Patient as a Person
Physical Generals

Thermal reaction: Chilly
Appetite: Good
Thirst (increased): With dryness of mouth
Milk agg.3: Acidity and joint pains
Craving: Sweet3
Aversion: Meat2, milk3
Sleep: Good, but full of dreams

Constipated since childhood, takes hot water in the morning, which helps her.
Constipation does not bother her.
Perspiration, in winter also; palm3, feet3, head at night.
Since a few years, palm and feet sweating reduced.

Menstrual Function

Menarche: At 16 years
Flow: 3-4 days
Blood: Dark red
During Menses Painful, bleeds more if there is tension
Menopause: At 41 years, flushes, bleeding increased, hypertension
Leucorrhoea: Thick, brownish

Mental Generals

She has undergone many hardships in life.
All complaints increase3 by tension, anxiety, vexation, grief and sorrow.
She is sentimental2, affectionate2, nervous3, has fear of darkness, lizards, creeping animals.

Classification and Evaluation of Symptoms

Anger, vexation, tension, grief – Mental causative modalities
Cold wet feet, agg. – Physical causative modalities
Milk agg. joints and stomach – Physical general modalities
Sour agg. joints and stomach – Physical general modalities
Craving – sweets – Physical general
Aversion – meat – Physical general
Aversion – milk – Physical general
Perspiration–head, soles, palms – Physical general
Arthritic pain  – Complaints in general
Stiffness – Complaints in general

Selection of Repertory

It is found that the case has strong causative modalities, general and particulars along with marked physical generals. This case demands Boger’s method of repertorization.

Selection of Rubrics

Rubrics Reason Page No.
1. Emotion < Strong mental causative modality 1166
2. Wet feet < Physical causative modalities 1152
3. Milk < Physical general modalities 1121
4. Sour < Physical general modalities 1122
5. Desire – sweet Physical general 477
6. Aversion–meat Physical general 474
7. Arthritic pain Complaints in general 882
8. Stiffness Complaints in general 925
Repertorial Result  
Bryonia 24/6
Calcarea carbonica 27/8
Ferrum metallicum 16/5
Lycopodium 28/7
Natrium muriaticum 22/7
Pulsatilla 32/7
Silicea 25/6
Sulphur 29/7

Analysis of Repertorial Result and Prescription

We have got a list of close running remedies; with the help of patient’s other symptoms, which are not included in the repertorial totality, the above medicines can he differentiated:
Patient is chilly.
Patient sweats on head, palms and soles. Any tension leads to menstrual bleeding.
Patient is mostly constipated which does not bother her. Moderately built.
This type of differentiation is called the ‘potential differential field’ (PDF).

Finally with the help of this technique, Calcarea carbonica was selected.

CASE–2

An 18 year old girl who was suffering from migraine presented the following picture:

Location Sensation Modalities Accompaniments
Head, right sided

Changing place Twice/week
Severe pain, terrible
pulling.
Wants open air.
Comes suddenly or slowly.
Starts after- noon or evening
>pressure3 < if tries to sleep
Uneasiness, likes fan.

She wants somebody nearby, likes a dark room, likes to close her eyes and lie down because of headache, but nothing gives her relief. This was the acute picture of the complaint.

Selection of Rubrics

Rubrics Reason Page No.
Head internal Location 250
Stomach, symptoms with Strong concomitant 290
Evening < Modality 280
Air open > Modality 292
Pressure external > Modality 294

Repertorial Result

Bryonia 14/4
Cocculus indicus 6/2
Natricum carbonicum 9/3
Pulsatilla 19/4
Sulphur 9/3

Analysis of Repertorial Result and Prescription

Two medicines, Bryonia and Pulsatilla run very closely. Pulsatilla was the final prescription because she wanted somebody nearby during the attacks and there was marked amelioration in open air.


CASE–3

A patient, 45 years, male, married, presented with the following medical report:
C/o: Difficulty in walking since 9 months.

Patient complains of swaying to either side, with tendency to fall, since 9 months. He also complains of difficulty in taking food to the mouth and slurring of speech. There is a persistent sticking sensation in the throat. No history of nasal regurgitation, headache, convulsions, ear discharge. Since last 2 months, he also notices a mild destabilization on turning the head. No history of headache, vomiting, trauma, fever or injections. All the symptoms are progressive in nature.

Non-diabetic, non-hypertensive.
Anaemia           – Absent
Jaundice            – Absent
Cyanosis           – Absent
Oedema            – Absent
Blood pressure – 130/80 mm of Hg
CNS:     
Higher functions – Normal
Cranial nerves – Normal
Motor system – Normal
Jerks – Superficial and deep, normal with flexor Babinski’s bilaterally
All modalities of sensations – Normal Cortical sensation – Normal Cerebellar signs – Positive bilaterally

Investigations

Blood sugar     
– Fasting: 102 mg%
– Postprandial: 143 mg%

Discussion

Presented with slowly progressive cerebellar disturbance. CT shows superior vermian and mild cerebellar hemispherical atrophy, consistent with the diagnosis of Holme’s cerebellar cortical atrophy.
It was also a case of transient blurring of vision on turning the head to the sides, for which Disprin had been started.

Final Diagnosis:

Cerebellar Degeneration (Holme’s).

On further enquiry, the following information was collected:
1. Difficulty in walking, swaying to either side
-Agg. on closing eyes3 Agg. walking slowly2 Amel. walking fast
2. Dizziness on turning neck
-Agg. sun3
3. Extremities: Feels that circulation has stopped
-Agg: rest3
-Agg. while rising3 Amel. moving about3
4. Joints: Neck, elbow, knee, ankle; pain with stiffness
=Amel. movement
5. X-ray cervical spine: Mild spondylotic changes are seen in the cervical vertebrae.

Some More Information About the Patient

Build: Well built
Appetite: Decreased
Stools: Regular
Thermal reaction: Chilly patient
Helping: Wounds, delayed healing (H/O)
Perspiration: Head3, palms2, soles2
Graying of hair: Started quite early (at the age of 30 years)
Sleep: Disturbed3; after 3:00 am (marked since many years), talks during sleep2

Small pox during childhood; marks present on face, but no complication afterwards
After eating, feels terribly weak; must rest for at least ten minutes
Heat of sun aggravates his all complaints

Diagnosis

Cerebellar degeneration (Holme’s), cervical spondylosis.

Selection of Repertory

It is noticed in the case that a common pathology ‘degeneration’ is running throughout. Early graying of hair also goes in favour of premature senility. Here ‘degeneration’ can be taken as an important pathological general. The case falls in the domain of Boger’s method of repertorization.
‘Senility’ is the rubric for degeneration, which is found in the chapter ‘Aggravation and Amelioration.’

Selection of Rubrics

Rubrics Reason Page No.
Senility Pathological general 1134
Sun, agg. General modality 1144
Eating after, agg. General modality 1114
Sleep, disturbed Physical general 994
after midnight    
Talking, sleep General 990
Sweating, head Characteristic feature of 1080
  person, concomitant  
Repertorial Result Calcarea carbonica     21/6
Baryta carbonica 17/3
Bryonia 21/6
Lachesis 21/5
Sulphur 20/5
Conium maculatum 12/3

Analysis of Repertorial Result and Prescription

Patient is chilly and there is marked sluggishness in the person’s activities since the beginning. So Calcarea carbonica was selected.

Case–4

A male, 56 years, who had been taking treatment for chronic pharyngitis, a known diabetic, presented with a complaint of vertigo which he developed suddenly in a long bus journey. On consultation, it was diagnosed as ‘benign paroxysmal vertigo.’ He was taking other medicines, but with partial relief only.

Symptoms

Feels that everything is rotating.
Sensation of pressure on the vertex, from inside out as if going to burst.
< night2
< lying down3
< lying down right side
> closing eyes3
< if gets up suddenly

Thirst: Decreased
Appetite: Not affected
Perspiration: 2+ (not associated with vertigo)
Stools: Motion regular

On the night previous to the journey, he got up suddenly because of a sound and could not sleep thereafter. Feels he is becoming forgetful.

Selection of Repertory

In this case, only some modalities and concomitants are marked. This case can be repertorized with the help of Boger’s repertory using the fourth method, that is, using diagnostic rubrics.

Selection of Rubrics (Chapter Vertigo)

Rubrics Reason
Night   <
Lying down <
Rising from bed <
Modalities
Modalities
Modalities
Memory affected Concomitant

Repertorial Result

Rhus toxicodendron 15/4
Phosphorus 12/4
Conium maculatum 13/4
Nux vomica 10/4

Analysis of Repertorial Result and Prescription

Considering the pathology and sphere of action as well as the symptom, closing eyes, amel., from Kent (in Boger’s repertory it is not well represented) – Conium fits the case. Conium 30 – daily doses were given.

CASE–5

A female, 46 years, suffering from rheumatoid arthritis since fifteen years, presented with the following picture.

Location Sensation Modalities
All joints
(started with left ankle, knee, hip, neck, shoulders)
Pain and stiffness.
Pain, swelling and heat with increasing and decreasing severity.
< first few movements2
< winter2
< morning2
Stiffness is more marked
(in ankle joints).
> hot application2
  > continued walking3

Patient as a Person
Physical Generals

Thermal reaction: Chilly
Perspiration: + Forehead
Appetite: Not so good, if slightly disturbed or depressed (patient’s language)
Cravings: Sour 3, coffee
Stool: Frequently hard stool

Menstrual Function

Menarche: 15 years
Regular cycle: 21 days
Clots++  
Before: Mood alteration
During: Pain lower abdomen

Mental Generals

Irritable3 – shouts Changing moods2
Sentimental3
Dreams – Talking to kids, praying She is a religious person

Selection of Repertory

In this case, location, sensation and modalities are prominent with marked physical generals. Mental state can be used for final differentiation. Hence, Boger’s repertory can be selected for repertorizing the case by using Roberts’s method.

Selection of Rubrics

Rubrics Reason Page No.
Upper extremities:    
Joints, in general Location 807
Pain, in general Sensation 823
Stiffness and heavyness Sensation 829
Lower extremities:    
Joints, in general Location 844
Pain, in general Sensation 860
Stiffness in ankle joint Sensation 866
Uncovering agg. Modality 1148
Craving sour Physical general 477

Repertorial Result

Calcarea carbonica 14/4
Kalium carbonicum 22/6
Sepia 28/8
Silicea 22/6
Sulphur 25/6

Analysis of Repertorial Result and Prescription

Kalium carbonicum, Sepia and Sulphur are running close in this list.
Patient is chilly and her mental symptoms decide the prescription in favor of Sepia.

Sepia 30 was prescribed.

Case–6

A 17 year old girl presented with 3-4 days of feeling feverish, having bodyache and tiredness, which was later diagnosed as be rheumatic fever. Record is presented below (in brief):

Location Sensation Modalities Accompaniments
General, 3-4 days Fever 102° F   Headache, throbbing
  Chill < morning Swelling both legs since morning
  Feverish feeling afternoon Constipated since one week
  Hot feeling Bodyache2
& tiredness2
< evening Thirst +
Fan, can tolerate no objection

O/E – 102° F
Blood pressure – 120/80 mm of Hg
Bilateral, pitting, pedal oedema
R.S. – N.A.D.
C.V.S. – N.A.D.

Rx Bryonia 200/4 doses hourly was prescribed

22-10-90 No relevant change
23-10-90 (8:00 am) Thirst, leg swelling – same, heat +
Appetite +, aphthous lower lip
C.V.S., R.S.—N.A.D
Motion passed, but not satisfactory
Investigation report –
Microfilaria – Negative
Hb – 11.9 gm %
T.L.C. – 4600/ mm3 N – 63%, L – 32%, E – 04%, M – 01%
E.S.R. – 20 mm/ hour
Urine – RBC (1–2), Pus cells – occasional, Epithelial cells – occasional
Last night there was slight feeling of coldness around midnight.
23-10-90 (3:15 pm) – Bryonia 200/4 doses hourly, continuous
With the heat – palm and soles are cold
Thirst + but less than before
Both legs swollen, knee joints painful Left elbow painful and swollen
Heat, joints +
Rx Bryonia 200/4 doses hourly continued
24-10-90
A.S.O. titre 600 I.U./ml of blood (diagnostic of rheumatic fever)
There are migratory joints affections
Thirst – Not marked, less than usual
No desire to uncover, always wants covering Urine – No complaints
Palms and soles are cold
Walking with difficulty, heavy legs

Following Rubrics are Selected:

Rubrics Page No.
Heat 1059
Time – evening 1059
Concomitants – thirstlessness 1069
Aversion to food 1068
Lower extremities heavy 1073
Hand cold 1072
Feet cold 1073
Uncovering, aversion to 1075

Pulsatilla gets highest marks. It has migratory joints pain and covers the rubric ‘rheumatic fever’ under pathological types (4 marks).
Pulsatilla 30 /4 doses hourly was prescribed on 24-10-90 at 4:30 pm.
26-10-90
Joints >
Highest temperature – 100.8° F. at 10.00 a.m.
Lowest temperature – 99.0° F. at 2.00 p.m.
27-10-90
Temperature – Afebrile
All joint– Swelling>
Tenderness >
Heat >
Appetite – Good, motion passed.
Slowly the joints recovered and the patient felt better.
C.V.S.             –      N.A.D.
R.S.                –      N.A.D.
Patient was discharged on 29-10-1990.

  • SPECIAL FEATURES 0F THE REPERTORY

Boger’s repertory is the latest among the three well known repertories in use, the other two being, Therapeutic Pocket Book and Kent’s repertory. Boger’s repertory has some special advantages over other repertories.

1.  Complete Symptoms

Each location is followed by the particular sensations, modalities and concomitants, which were lacking in Therapeutic Pocket Book and Kent’s Repertory.

For reference as well as repertorization of a case where particulars are dominating the picture, this repertory can be utilized with advantage. Thus, it is more useful in acute and short cases.

2.   Diagnostic Rubrics

We find many diagnostic clinical rubrics mentioned in each chapter with a group of medicines. These medicines have been used in the conditions mentioned and found to be useful in a majority of cases. Thus, they have been proved and verified.

There are controversies regarding the use of diagnostic rubrics, but diagnostic rubrics cannot be neglected as they have a group of common symptoms, which medicines also have produced in provings. But, since there is similarity only at the level of common symptoms, the result can be of a lesser quality.

3.   Pathological Generals

This repertory contains many pathological generals, which are valuable for repertorization and selecting a simillimum. For example:

Haemorrhage, tendency to     –      Sensations and Complaints
Uric acid diathesis       –          Aggravation
Discharges                             –      Sensations and Complaints
Suppuration                            –      Sensations and Complaints
Inflammation                         –      Sensations and Complaints

4.   Rubric — Infant, Affections of

This is a big rubric with many subrubrics in the chapter ‘Sensation and Complaints in General’. This is unique and very useful in paediatric practice.

5.  Constitution

Different types of constitutions with a group of medicines are available in the chapter, ‘Sensations and Complaints in General.’ This reduces the practitioner’s work and helps him to find the simillimum by using it in the first place in totality.

6.  Separate Concomitants

This chapter follows modalities in most of the locations. In Therapeutic Pocket Book, concomitants are not given separately except in a few chapters. Boger made it more useful for practice by attaching concomitants to the parts.

7.   Fever Chapter

This is a unique work of Boger. From a practical point of view, this chapter is of immense use. It has many sub-divisions also. Concomitants in relation to chill, heat and sweat under different headings are really valuable for bedside practice. This is one of the best repertories for fever cases.

8.  Cross-reference

This subsection is given at the end of most of the chapters, which helps us to find an appropriate rubric.

9.  Mind Section

This repertory begins with a large ‘Mind’ section, which is quite elaborate. Of course, it does not compete with Kent’s section on ‘mind’, but sometimes, one has to refer to it to find out some rubrics, which are not mentioned in Kent (for example, cf. section 11 of this chapter).

10.  Menstruation Chapter

This is well arranged and followed by concomitants in the following order:
Before menses
At the start of menses During menses
After menses

All these were not available at one place before this repertory was published. Similarly chapters on stool, leucorrhoea, micturition, etc, are also found in the repertory.

  • MENTAL RUBRICS IN BOENNINGHAUSEN’S CHARACTERISTICS AND REPERTORY

A list of mental rubrics in Boenninghausen’s Characteristics and Repertory, not found in Kent’s repertory as main rubrics under ‘Mind’ section are given below:
Alcoholism Automatisms
Awkwardness (this rubric is found in Kent’s Repertory under Extremities)
Beautiful, things look
Beclouded, dim Beseeching
Beside, oneself being Blissful feeling (joy in Kent) Brainfag, exhaustion Carefree
Catalepsy (under Generalities in Kent)
Clear headed
Clothes himself improperly Cold, frigid
Collar, pulls at Communicative
Compassion, sympathy (sympathetic in Kent)
Comprehension, easy
Contradictory to speech, intentions are Crankiness
Death agony Deliberate Delicacy, feeling of
Disconsolate, unhappy Discordant  Discourses, holds
Dizziness and instability of Duality, sense of Execrations
Ill-humour, crossness Imitation, mimicking Impressionable Insecurity
Murmuring, in sleep Overactive
Paranoia Passionate Patient Peevish Pensive
Persecuted, feels Perseverance Playful Presentiments Profanity Resignation Rivalry Satyriasis
Surly Taciturn
Tastes, everything Trance
Unamiable, unfriendly Untidy

Rubrics in ‘Boenninghausen’s Characteristics and Repertory’ by Boger – not to be found in Synthetic Repertory as main rubrics: In general:
Agitated (compare Excitement)
Alcoholism, intoxication, etc (compare Delirium tremens)
Aphasia
Assembled things, swarms, crowds, etc, hallucinations of
Awkwardness
Bad part, takes everything in; easily offended (compare Sensitiveness)
Bashful
Beautiful, things look
Beclouded, dim
Benumbed
Beseeching
Bewildered, strange, everything seems, as if in a dream errors of locality, disordered orientation
Bold exhaustion
Brain
Buffoonery
Calling
Calmness, composure, tranquility, etc
Carefree
Careless, heedless, etc
Clearheaded
Clothes himself improperly
Cold, frigid
Collar, pulls at
Compassion, sympathy (immoderate)
Corner, mops or broods in a
Crankiness
Dejection, despondency (compare Low spirits, Despair)
Deliberate Delicacy, feeling of
Depression (compare Sadness)
Disconsolate, unhappy
Discourses, holds
Dissatisfied, discontent, wants this then that
Distracted, preoccupied, unobservant, difficult concentration, can’t think
Dizziness and instability of (compare Variableness)
Dogmatic, opinionated, etc (compare Haughty)
Domineering, imperious (compare Importance)
Drunken, sense of
Duality, sense of
Excitable (compare Irritable)
Execrations
Expressions, difficult Failure, feels himself a
Faultfinding, reproachable, etc
Ferocity
Finery, fond of
Flings away, what he holds in his hand, inclination to (compare Desired things)
Fly out of her skin
Fretful
Future, confounds the future with the past
Gaiety, joyfulness (compare Liveliness)
Gentle, mild, tender
Gloomy (compare Melancholy)
Grasps at others Groaning, moaning
Guilt, sense of, (compare Remorse)
Hands, clapping
Headstrong, obstinate, defiant, stubborn
Held, wants to be
Homicidal, murder, etc.
Ill-humour, crossness (compare Peevish)
Illness, sense of sick feeling Illusions, delusions, visions, etc
Imaginations, fancies, fixed ideas (compare Illusions)
Importance, feels his (compare Domineering)
Indecision, hesitation
Insults, imagines
Intellect, impaired, mental exhaustion, weakness of, etc.
Insert, lack of
Intoxicated, as if
Knife, impulse to injure with (compare Homicidal)
Learning to speak, late in
Licks up, things
Lies, thinks her words are
Life, satiety of (compare Suicidal)
Lively, animated, vivacious (compare Gaiety)
Low spirited (compare Sadness, Dejection, Melancholy, etc)
Mistrust, suspicion, doubt
Mournfulness
Mouth, puts things into
Muscles, don’t respond to will
Nervous exhaustion
Nonsensical
Nose, grasps others
Open-hearted
Oppression
Pain, intolerant of
Paranoia
Peevishness, fretful (compare Ill)
Humour, anger
Pensive, deep in thought (compare Thought)
Perplexity
Persecuted, feels
Fantasies (compare Imaginations)
Phlegmatic
Photomania
Pinch, impulse to
Plays with fingers
Possessed, as if demonical mania, etc
Presence of mind wanting
Presentiments, premonitions, foreboding, etc
Profanity, cursing, etc
Projects, full of
Proud, arrogant, self-esteem, haughty, airs, etc
Punctilious
Pyromania 
Relatives, ignores his
Relaxation, mental prostration
Repeats same thing
Repenting, bad conscience, etc
Repulses, help
Reveries, daydream, etc
Rich, fancies himself
Roaring
Salvation, doubt of
Scolds, to herself (compare Abusive)
Sense, absence of, anoia
Shouting
Sickness, simulates
Skeptical
Snarling, like a dog
Snatching
Solicitation
Solicitude
Solitude, love of (compare Company)
Spinning, imitates
Spiritless
Spirituality, lack of
Sprightliness (compare Lively)
Stamping
Stiff
Still
Stupidity (compare Comprehension)
Supplication
Surely, sullen, morose (compare Anger)
Swallows, faeces, etc
Taciturn, silent, mute, etc (compare Quietness)
Tedium, ennui
Tender mood
Thieves, delusion of
Tossing about
Unamiable, unfriendly, etc
Uneasiness
Unruly
Unsociable, shy, averse to society (compare Bashful, Reserve)
Variable, vacillating and alternating moods
Vexation, also affects
Vigor, feeling of
Volition, affected
Wailing
Whining, whimpering
Whispering
Word hunting

  • CRITICISM

Though it is claimed that Boger’s work improved and updated Boenninghausen’s Therapeutic Pocket Book, many difficulties have been noticed while using Boger’s repertory. In practice, it could not replace the Therapeutic Pocket Book, which is still helping many practitioners because of it’s individuality in construction and contents. The following difficulties are particularly noteworthy:

  1. Chapter of Concordances contains only 125 remedies. Though the arrangement of the remedies and construction are borrowed from Boenninghausen’s Therapeutic Pocket Book, the number of remedies under each heading are less and therefore, for practical purposes it falls short and cannot compete with the Therapeutic Pocket Book.
  2. In Boger’s repertory, ‘Mind’ section has been enlarged, developed and made more useful from a  practical point   of view. It is enriched with many rubrics, subrubrics and     a large section of ‘cross-reference’, but the ‘concomitants’, subsection of ‘Mind’ does not help practitioners as it contains only a group of medicines. Thus, it does not convey a very useful meaning. No rubrics or subrubrics have been mentioned, whereas other subsections on concomitants are well arranged usefully.
    In this group, even important medicines like – Kalium bichromicum, Kalium bromatum, Kalium phosphoricum, Natrium carbonicum, Thuja, etc do not find any place. However some of the physical concomitants are mentioned in the subsection on aggravation and amelioration.
  3. Though it is said that all the parts/chapters of the repertory are followed by time, aggravation, amelioration and concomitants, very often the concomitant subsection is absent, and concomitants are mentioned under the heading of aggravation.
  4. Construction: There are 53 chapters in the repertory and a definite order is not followed. For example:
    Mouth: Subchapter      
    – Palate
    -Throat
    – Saliva
    -Tongue
    Stomach:
    – Epigastrium
    -Hypochondria
    These two different chapters are followed by a chapter on Abdomen.
  5. Arrangement: A definite order of arrangement is not found in the repertory. Thus, the practitioner finds it difficult to search for a rubric.
  6. Similar Rubrics: Boger has used similar rubrics in different sections, which creates confusion for beginners. For example:
    Confusion                       –    Sensorium
    Confuse                          –    Mind
    Women in                      –    Aggravation
    Female                           –    Aggravation
    Faintness, rising on      –          Sensorium
    Faintness, on rising         –    Sensations and Complaints in General
    Though the group of medicines is not very different, in ‘Faintness – raising on – sensorium’, important medicines like Cocculus are missing.
  7. Misplacing of Rubrics: Several rubrics are not given at proper places, thus creating a difficulty in finding them.
    For example, cf. section 7 of this chapter.
  8. Many rubrics have only a single or a few medicines. Sensations and Complaints in General –Bitter                            – Bufo rana
    Cold, tendency to take – Benzoicum acidum
    Cretinism                      – Calcarea phosphorica
    Mind –
    Mischievousness            – Arsenicum album
    Extravagance                 – Belladonna
    Execration                     – Nitricum acidum
    Ferocity                        – Opium
    Patience                        – Magnesium muriaticum

    Though these rubrics are quite useful and meaningful, they cannot be used for the purpose of repertorization; rather they very often confuse and misguide the practitioner.
  9. Though this repertory is the latest one, it does not represent many medicines.
  10. Rubrics do not contain a larger group of medicines. Thus, many medicines are missing under appropriate rubrics. For example:
    Mischievousness – Arsenicum album is the only medicine given.
    Sentimental         – Natricum muriaticum is missing
  11. Even some information, which is available in his Synoptic Key, is not found in the repertory. For example:
    Dreams of snakes – Lachesis not given in the repertory.

    Reference: Essentials of Repertorization 5th Edition by Dr S.K. Tiwari
Dr Purnima Rani
Posted By: Dr Purnima Rani

Dr Purnima Rani, M.D. (Hom.) in Repertory from Dr Bhim Rao Ambedkar University, Agra and completed her B.H.M.S. from Nehru Homoeopathic Medical College &amp; Hospital, having clinical experience of 4+ years.